Native New Yorker
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YES!

Nothing beats a NYC night

Nothing beats a NYC night

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Vintage Travel Poster

Vintage Travel Poster

More than 3,000 hot dog stands in New York City

More than 3,000 hot dog stands in New York City

Grand Central Terminal 

 The clock atop the information booth has been valued at $10 million to $20 million. The four faces are made entirely of solid precious opal. This 1913 clock is mechanical and still runs on Swiss motors, but is also set constantly with the atomic clock in the naval observatory in Bethesda, Md. So next time you walk through Grand Central, set your watch, the clocks in the terminal are accurate within 1 second every 1.4 million years.

Grand Central Terminal 

 The clock atop the information booth has been valued at $10 million to $20 million. The four faces are made entirely of solid precious opal. This 1913 clock is mechanical and still runs on Swiss motors, but is also set constantly with the atomic clock in the naval observatory in Bethesda, Md. So next time you walk through Grand Central, set your watch, the clocks in the terminal are accurate within 1 second every 1.4 million years.

Subway riders, New York City, 1914, Francis Luis Mora. American Painter, born in Uruguay (1874 - 1940)

Subway riders, New York City, 1914, Francis Luis Mora. American Painter, born in Uruguay (1874 - 1940)

thedustyrebel:

The Mosaic Trail
Tompkins Square Park, NYCMore photos of Jim Power, The Mosaic Man’s work.

thedustyrebel:

The Mosaic Trail

Tompkins Square Park, NYC
More photos of Jim Power, The Mosaic Man’s work.

aliceolive:

Lovely… never, ever change.
Keep that breathless charm.
Won’t you please arrange it?
Cause I love you, just the way you look tonight.
Tompkins Square Park, New York

aliceolive:

Lovely… never, ever change.

Keep that breathless charm.

Won’t you please arrange it?

Cause I love you, just the way you look tonight.

Tompkins Square Park, New York

mariana-silva13:

Merry Christmas and Happy holidays!

mariana-silva13:

Merry Christmas and Happy holidays!

horoscopegangsta:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY WILL SMITH
September 25th

horoscopegangsta:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY WILL SMITH

September 25th

nevver:

  1. “Writing is easy. All you have to do is cross out the wrong words.” — Mark Twain
  2. “I only achieve simplicity with enormous effort.” — Clarice Lispector
  3. “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.” — Virginia Woolf
  4. “I’ve put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant, and that’s the only way of insuring one’s immortality.” — James Joyce
  5. “The first draft of anything is shit.” — Ernest Hemingway
  6. “Always be a poet, even in prose.” — Charles Baudelaire
  7. “Literature — creative literature — unconcerned with sex, is inconceivable.” — Gertrude Stein
  8. “If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don’t write, because our culture has no use for it.” — Anaïs Nin
  9. “One can be absolutely truthful and sincere even though admittedly the most outrageous liar. Fiction and invention are of the very fabric of life.” — Henry Miller
  10. “Writers aren’t people exactly. Or, if they’re any good, they’re a whole lot of people trying so hard to be one person.” — F. Scott Fitzgerald
  11. “The true writer has nothing to say. What counts is the way he says it.” — Alain Robbe-Grillet
  12. “James Joyce was a synthesizer, trying to bring in as much as he could. I am an analyzer, trying to leave out as much as I can.” — Samuel Beckett
  13. “Life is painful and disappointing. It is useless, therefore, to write new realistic novels. We generally know where we stand in relation to reality and don’t care to know any more.” — Michel Houellebecq
  14. “Do you realize that all great literature is all about what a bummer it is to be a human being? Isn’t it such a relief to have somebody say that?” — Kurt Vonnegut
  15. “Skill alone cannot teach or produce a great short story, which condenses the obsession of the creature; it is a hallucinatory presence manifest from the first sentence to fascinate the reader, to make him lose contact with the dull reality that surrounds him, submerging him in another that is more intense and compelling.” — Julio Cortázar
  16. “Don’t bend; don’t water it down; don’t try to make it logical; don’t edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly.” — Franz Kafka
  17. “Reading is more important than writing.” — Roberto Bolaño
  18. “The artist is always beginning. Any work of art which is not a beginning, an invention, a discovery is of little worth.” — Ezra Pound
  19. “The next real literary “rebels” in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles. Who treat of plain old untrendy human troubles and emotions in U.S. life with reverence and conviction. Who eschew self-consciousness and hip fatigue. These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the “Oh how banal.” To risk accusations of sentimentality, melodrama. Of overcredulity. Of softness. Of willingness to be suckered by a world of lurkers and starers who fear gaze and ridicule above imprisonment without law. Who knows.” — David Foster Wallace
  20. “The person born with a talent they are meant to use will find their greatest happiness in using it.” — Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  21. “We live not only in a world of thoughts, but also in a world of things. Words without experience are meaningless.” — Vladimir Nabokov
  22. “…Describe your sorrows and desires, the thoughts that pass through your mind and your belief in some kind of beauty – describe all these with heartfelt, silent, humble sincerity and, when you express yourself, use the Things around you, the images from your dreams, and the objects that you remember. If your everyday life seems poor, don’t blame it; blame yourself; admit to yourself that you are not enough of a poet to call forth its riches; because for the creator there is not poverty and no poor, indifferent place. And even if you found yourself in some prison, whose walls let in none of the world’s sounds – wouldn’t you still have your childhood, that jewel beyond all price, that treasure house of memories? Turn your attentions to it. Try to raise up the sunken feelings of this enormous past; your personality will grow stronger, your solitude will expand and become a place where you can live in the twilight, where the noise of other people passes by, far in the distance. — And if out of this turning-within, out of this immersion in your own world, poems come, then you will not think of asking anyone whether they are good or not. Nor will you try to interest magazines in these works: for you will see them as your dear natural possession, a piece of your life, a voice from it. A work of art is good if it has arisen out of necessity. That is the only way one can judge it.” — Rainer Maria Rilke
  23. “The words of my book nothing, the drift of it everything.” — Walt Whitman
  24. “All I know is what the words know, and dead things, and that makes a handsome little sum, with a beginning and a middle and an end, as in the well-built phrase and the long sonata of the dead.” — Samuel Beckett
  25. “Do you know what I was smiling at? You wrote down that you were a writer by profession. It sounded to me like the loveliest euphemism I had ever heard. When was writing ever your profession? It’s never been anything but your religion. Never. I’m a little overexcited now. Since it is your religion, do you know what you will be asked when you die? But let me tell you first what you won’t be asked. You won’t be asked if you were working on a wonderful, moving piece of writing when you died. You won’t be asked if it was long or short, sad or funny, published or unpublished. You won’t be asked if you were in good or bad form while you were working on it. You won’t even be asked if it was the one piece of writing you would have been working on if you had known your time would be up when it was finished—I think only poor Soren K. will get asked that. I’m so sure you’ll only get asked two questions. Were most of your stars out? Were you busy writing your heart out? If only you knew how easy it would be for you to say yes to both questions. ” — J.D. Salinger

magdalilly:

Unsung Classic Black Beauties of the 1930’s and 1940’s

0:15 - 0:18 Nina Mae McKinney - Actress/Dancer/Singer
0:18 - 0:20 Betti Mays - 1940’s Singer/Dancer
0:20 - 0:22 - Anne Wiggins Brown - Concert Singer/Broadway Actress of Porgy
0:22 - 0:24 Blanche Thompson - Dancer/Creator of The Brownskin Models Revue
0:24 - 0:26 Ethel Moses - Cotton Club Dancer/Actress
0:26 - 0:28 Mauri Lynn - Actress/Model
0:28 - 0:30 Dolores Brown - Singer/Recording Artist
0:30 - 0:32 Louise Franklin - Movie Dancer/Actress
0:32 - 0:33 Evelyn Preer - Actress/Singer
0:34 - 0:35 Marion Egbert - Cotton Club Chorine
0:36 - 0:38 Lavada Carter - 1930s Singer/Dancer
0:39 - 0:40 Valaida Snow - Singer/Dancer/Trumpeter
0:41 - 0:42 Hilda Simms - Actress
0:43 - 0:44 Hazel Scott - Singer/Pianist
0:44 - 0:45 Margot - 1930’s Ballroom Dancer of Margot and Norton
0:46 - 0:47 Joyce Bryant - 1950’s Singer
0:48 - 0:49 Margaret Whitten - 1930’s/1940’s Actress
0:50 - 0:51 Cleo Hayes - 1930’s/1940’s Dancer / Cotton Club
0:52 - 0:53 Jean Parks - 1940’s Singer/Friend of Malcolm X
0:54 - 0:55 Marie Bryant - Dancer
0:56 - 0:58 Ellen Holly - Actress
0:59 - 1:00 Marva Trotter Louis - Model/First Wife of Joe Louis
1:00 - 1:02 Una Mae Carlisle - Singer/Pianist/Songwriter
1:02 - 1:04 Gladys Snyder - 1940’s Actress
1:04 - 1:06 Edna Mae Harris - Actress/Singer/Dancer
1:06 - 1:08 Anna Mae Winburn - Singer/Bandleader of The Sweethearts of Rhythm
1:08 - 1:10 Vivienne Baber - 1930’s/1940’s Actress
1:10 - 1:12 Ginger Smock - Violinist
1:12 - 1:14 Lucille Battle/Mille Monroe - Actresses/Dancers
1:15 - 1:17 Angela De Lavallade - Actress/Model
1:17 - 1:19 Pat Rainey - Singer
1:19 - 1:21 Edna Mae Holly - Dancer/First wife of Sugar Ray Robinson
1:21 - 1:23 Pauline Green - Model
1:23 - 1:24 Etta Rae - Model
1:25 - 1:27 Anise Boyer - Dancer/Cotton Club/Anise and Aland
1:27 - 1:30 Millie Monroe, Mildred Boyd, Louise Franklin - Dancers/Actresses
1:30 - 1:32 Florence O’Brien - Comedian/Singer/Dancer/Actress
1:32 - 1:34 Suzette Harbin - Actress/Dancer
1:34 - 1:36 Nellie Hill - Singer/Actress
1:37 - 1:39 Francine Everett - Singer/Actress
1:39 - 1:41 Victoria Spivey - Blues Singer
1:41 - 1:43 Theresa Harris - Hollywood Actress/Singer
1:43 - 1:45 Ruby Hill - Singer
1:46 - 1:47 Bette McLaurin - Singer
1:47 - 1:50 Sarah Lou Harris - Model
1:50 - 1:52 Artie Young - Dancer/Actress
1:52 - 1:54 Madeline Belt - Dancer
1:54 - 1:57 Sahji / Madeline Jackson - Exotic Dancer
1:58 - 2:00 Connie Harris - Exotic Dancer
2:01 - 2:03 - Ida James - Singer/Actress
2:03 - 2:04 Rita Christiani - Dancer
2:05 - 2:07 Meta Cardoza - Dancer
2:07 - 2:09 Madelyn Green - Singer
2:09 - 2:10 Carroll Chilton - Dance Team of Chilton and Thomas
2:11 - 2:12 Eunice Wilson - 1930s Singer/Dancer
2:13 - 2:14 Neeka Shaw - 1930’s Entertainer
2:15 - 2:17 The Pope Sisters - 1930’s Sister Singing Group
2:17 - 2:19 Vivian Dandridge - Singer/Actress
2:20 - 2:22 Sheila Guyse - 1940s Singer/Actress
2:22 - 2:25 Judy Carol - Dancer/Singer
2:25 - 2:27 - Dorothy Van Engle - 1930s Model/Oscar Micheaux Actress
2:28 - 2:29 Ruth Hill - 1940s Singer
2:30 - 2:31 Fredi Washington - Actress/Dancer
2:32 - 2:33 - Isabel Washington - Actress/Dancer
2:34 - 2:35 Louise Jota Cook - 1930s Dancer
2:36 - 2:37 Blanche Calloway - Singer/Bandleader
2:38 - 2:39 Savannah Churchill - Singer/Recording Artist
2:40 - 2:41 Izinetta Wilcox - Actress/Singer
2:48 - 2:51 Florence Mills -
2:52 - 2:55 Bessie Smith -
2:56 - 2:59 Ethel Waters
3:00 - 3:04 Maude Russell - Dancer/Actress - Introduced The Charleston
3:05 - 3:07 Josephine Baker
3:08 - 3:11 Adelaide Hall
3:12 - 3:16 Valaida Snow
3:16 - 3:19 Lucia Moses - Cotton Club Chorine/Dancer/Star of Scar of Shame
3:20 - 3:23 Alice Whitman - Tap Dancer/Apart of The Whitman Sisters Revue that opened the doors for many black performers
3:24 - 3:28 Nina Mae McKinney
3:29 - 3:32 Hycinth Curtis - Cotton Club Dancer
3:33 - 3:36 Etta Moten
3:37 - 3:40 Elisabeth Welch
3:41 - 3:44 Billie Holiday
3:45 - 3:47 Maxine Sullivan
3:47 - 3:50 Ella Fitzgerald
3:51 - 3:54 Lena Horne
3:55 - 3:59 Katherine Dunham
4:00 - 4:02 Sarah Vaughn
4:03 - 4:06 Hazel Scott
4:07 - 4:10 Hadda Brooks
4:10 - 4:14 Eartha Kitt
4:15 - 4:19 Sheila Guyse
4:20 - 4:22 Dorothy Dandridge
4:23 - 4:26 Suzette Harbin
4:27 - 4:30 Ophelia DeVore - Pioneer of Black Models
4:31 - 4:35 Tessa Prendergast - Pioneer Designer
4:36 - 4:39 Pearl Bailey
4:40 - 4:43 Muriel Rahn
4:44 - 4:48 Ruby Dee

    wiccan-workings:

    Emerald
    Symbolizes immortality and rebirth. Whether raw or faceted, it provides enormous inspiration on the spiritual path and gives patience  to pass through challenges with equanimity.

    Chakra: third eye, heart
    Physiological Correspondents: eyes, sinuses, lungs, spine, muscles, heart, pancreas, liver, lymphatic system, malignant conditions
    Vibrations: Earthy

    Legend Power

    • Shakespeare: It held the power to soothe the eyes
    • Ivan the Terrible: Being of nature’s rainbow, an enemy of uncleanness 
    • Hebrew Tradition: Serpents that look on it went blind
    • Pliny of Rome: Use as a magnifying lens and says that nothing in nature compared to the stone’s intense green: “Neither dim nor yet the light of a candle causes them to lose their luster.”
    • Incas: Prized crystal as representing the green Earth
    • Middle Ages: Placed under the tongue to induce prophetic vision

    Healing Power

    • Visual clarity 
    • Soothes inflamed eyes
    • Stimulates sight and insight
    • Prevents epilepsy
    • Calms the spirit
    • Rid the presence of poison

    Transformational Power

    • Promotes friendship
    • Promotes unconditional love
    • Enhances relationships on all levels
    • Keeps partnerships in harmony
    • Balances the emotional, mental and spiritual level
    • Turns negativity into positive action
    • Used to stimulate metaphysical abilities 
    • Opens a broader vision that sees beyond the projections of the material world
    • Traditionally harnessed to see into the future
    • Ensures a fortuitous rebirth
    • Ensures a happy marriage

    Harnessing the Power

    • Wear Emerald to attract successful love
    • Keep Emerald once you’ve found this
    • Worn constantly, Emerald can overstimulate**

    [Source; 101 Power Crystals: The Ultimate Guide to Magical Crystals, Gems, and Stones for Healing and Transformation by Judy Hall]